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How To Grow Clematis With Big Beautiful Blooms

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If you want to learn how to prune and grow Clematis to produce big, beautiful flowers all summer long, this guide has all of the information you need.

How To Grow Clematis With Big Beautiful Blooms | If you are looking for ideas on how to prune, grow and care for Clematis to get those big purple, blue and pink blooms in your garden, this guide will definitely help! It even includes a list of the best varieties to grow.
How To Grow Clematis

I have come to the realization that I am a little obsessed with Clematis.

I didn’t actually know how obsessed until I started taking pictures for this post. There are 25 different varieties of Clematis growing in my garden at the moment! And I’m not ruling out getting some more :)

However, I think I’m justified.  All you have to do is look at those beautiful blooms to know why I have so many of them.

How To Grow Clematis With Big Beautiful Blooms | If you are looking for ideas on how to prune, grow and care for Clematis to get those big purple, blue and pink blooms in your garden, this guide will definitely help! It even includes a list of the best varieties to grow.
How and Where to Grow Clematis

But that’s not the only reason.  Clematis is a very versatile and easy to grow vine.  It comes in many colors, sizes and bloom times.  There are varieties with large flowers, small flowers, single or double petals, bell-shaped or tubular blooms.  Some varieties will only grow to be 2 – 3 feet tall, while others can cover the side of a garage.

And in almost all cases, the clematis vines are not invasive, so you can grow them through other bushes without worrying about killing the plants (I do have experience with a couple of exceptions which I will tell you about later).

It has so many redeeming qualities that I think should be a part of everyone’s garden (which is why clematis is on my all-time favorite perennials list).

So that’s the “why” to grow Clematis…click Next to find out the where and how to grow Clematis.

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12 Responses

  1. Sharon
    | Reply

    What is the length of time for the blooms?

    • Wanda
      | Reply

      Hi Sharon…the bloom time varies quite a bit depending on the variety, but most of them bloom for 3 to 4 weeks. I also find a lot of them last longer when it’s not too hot, so some of it will depend on where you live.

  2. sherry napier
    | Reply

    Where can I order the Bell of woking clematis. I got one and now know one has them, I just love the flowers.

    • Wanda
      | Reply

      Hi Sherry…I got mine from Wayside Gardens but you’re right, it doesn’t look like they are carrying them this year. I found a couple online at brushwoodnursery.com and Walmart (of all places!)…so hopefully that helps!

    • Joy
      | Reply

      Joy Creek Nursery has Belle of Woking and just about any other clematis! Their website is joycreek.com and they sell mail order. If you’re ever in Oregon, their display gardens are definitely worth a visit!

      • Wanda
        | Reply

        Thanks for letting us know, Joy! I’m going to check out their website :)

  3. Brenda Harrington
    | Reply

    I also live in South Carolina, Summerville to be exact, the clematis I have is group 2, I think, it blooms on old wood but very sparse, and then I get new branches coming up too, I’m so confused, a neighbor down the street told me not to prune at all, I have mulch around the roots to keep it cool, and the top is in some light morning sun and late evening sun but it looks so pathetic, I’m from Alaska where we can’t grow them at all because of the short summers, it has new sprouts popping out just about year round, and then we get cold again and they die off, but as soon as we have unusual warm Temps they sprout leaves but no flowers, help please if you can I’m confused.

    • Wanda
      | Reply

      Hi Brenda…In my area (Greenville), I find Clematis blooms really well in the spring and the fall (and often the same plant will bloom twice). But most of them look really pathetic in the summer…I think it’s just too hot. Since yours is blooming on old wood, youor neighbor’s suggestion of not pruning it could also help (to be honest, I rarely prune any of my Clematis unless they are growing somewhere I don’t want them). You can also try sprinkling compost, organic rose fertilizer, bone meal or alfalfa pellets (ie. rabbit or deer food) around the bottom of it. General fertilizers (like Miracle Gro or Osmocote) have too much Nitrogen, which produces a lot of leaves but not flowers so I wouldn’t use those. Clematis are so beautiful when they are blooming…I hope this works!

  4. Julie
    | Reply

    Hi I have a beautiful clematis which I bought already flowered but the flower leaves are falling off what can I do thankyou.

    • Wanda
      | Reply

      Hi Julie…I suspect it’s either too hot, too dry or needs some Clematis fertilizer.

      Clematis like to have cool roots, so if you think it is too hot, you can try spreading some mulch around the bottom of the plant or planting a low growing perennial in front of it to keep the sun off. The mulch will also help to keep the soil from drying out too fast.

      Having said that, I live in an area where the summers are really hot and humid…most of my Clematis look like they are having a hard time in the summer, but they always bounce back once it starts to cool down in the fall.

      Those big, beautiful Clematis blooms do require a lot of nutrients from the soil. You can try using a Clematis fertilizer (should not be too high in Nitrogen). Or if you want to go the organic route, sprinkle alfalfa pellets around the base of the plant and water them until they turn mushy.

      If you are still having problems, you can also cut it back, pretty close to the ground and let it re-grow.

      Hope this helps!

  5. Michelle
    | Reply

    Maybe try grass clippings around the bases of the plants. I have two of my plants in a garden bed around an old stump. One is in direct sun, the other in part sun, and they both seem to do equally well. I actually have never pruned my plants, unless cutting off a newly rooted vine. Love your pictures and advice!

    • Wanda
      | Reply

      Thanks, Michelle! I have to admit, I don’t usually get around to pruning mine either and they seem to do fine :) But I think I do get more blooms when I actually do prune them properly.

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