How To Host A Traditional Tea Party

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How To Host a Traditional Tea Party
How To Host a Traditional Tea Party

The traditional tea party is a perfect setting for an afternoon event that requires some formality, such as a wedding or baby shower…or in our case, a Christmas open house.

The afternoon tea at the Ritz London | How To Host a Traditional Tea Party
The afternoon tea at the Ritz London

This tea party stems from the British tradition of “afternoon tea”.  This gathering involves tea served in a fine china cup and saucer, scones with clotted cream and jam, small watercress and cucumber sandwiches (without crusts) and bite-sized cakes and sweets.

The sweets buffet at our Christmas Tea Party | How To Host a Traditional Tea Party
The sweets buffet at our Christmas Tea Party

Traditionally, this is a sit-down event, but there were too many people to do that for our open house, so our traditional tea party was served buffet-style.  This does add a little more work because the tea in the pots does not stay warm for very long and has to be replaced every 20 – 30 minutes.

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4 Responses

  1. Wanda, I came to this post from Pinterest. I love giving, and going out for, afternoon teas. It’s such a treat!

    • Hi Jean…I couldn’t agree more! There’s something about afternoon tea that just makes you want to sit and relax for a little bit. Thanks for stopping by!

  2. Rochelle

    High tea was the working mans tea as it was served on a dining room table (a high table) It consisted of meats breads and of course a pot of tea. It is often confused with “afternoon” tea and is which is what you are referring to. This is the tea that consists of finger sandwiches, scones and dainty pastries. People seem to think that “high” means elegant, but it is quite the opposite.

    • Hi Rochelle…Thanks for the clarification! I will update my post.

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