How To Make Jello Easter Eggs With DIY Eggshell Molds

I love to do table decorations for Easter, like this pink and green tablescape and these bunny folded napkins. These jello Easter eggs are a fun way to make an Easter treat that also adds to the table decor.

Jello Easter Eggs Recipe

How To Make Jello Easter Eggs

With Easter approaching, I thought I would share this fun way to use jello to make Jello Easter Eggs.

They look really pretty on the table, so they serve double duty…Easter dessert that also works as decor.

I don’t own a jello egg mold so I made my own DIY jello egg molds using real eggs.

Since I already had the eggs, they’re free. And you can peel the shells right off so the jello is less likely to break than if you’re using a mold.

How To Make Jello Easter Eggs

What You’ll Need

To make a 6 jello Easter eggs, you’ll need about 1 3-ounce (small) packages of jello. Plus the 6 eggs that will be your jello egg molds.

The great thing about jello is that you can choose whatever color you want. I usually like to do more than one color (so I make the recipe more than once).

How To Make The Jello Egg Molds

The first step to making your own jello egg molds is to remove the eggs from their shells without breaking the shells.

Start by breaking a hole in the small end of the egg using the sharp end of a metal skewer*.

Make a hole in the egg shell that is larger than the straw (this hole is a little too small)

The hole needs to be big enough that the straw will fit in and have a little extra space around it.  And you will really make your life easier if the end of the funnel can fit in it, also…less mess when pouring the jello in later on.

The hole that I made in the picture above wasn’t big enough…there should be some space around the straw.

Then insert one end of the straw into the hole that you made.

Hold the egg over the bowl and blow into the free end of the straw. The air will make the contents of the egg come out through the hole around the straw.

It really isn’t as hard as it sounds…the egg will come out pretty quickly.

Rinse the inside of the eggshell with water to remove any egg that remains inside.

Let it drain, hole side down, in the egg carton.

Repeat this process for as many Easter eggs as you want to make.

Make The Jello

To make the jello, we’re going to use a little less water than usual. That will keep the jello mold firm and make sure it keeps its Easter egg shape.

First, mix 1 cup of boiling water with the jello and stir until the jello crystals have dissolved completely.

Then add 1/2 cup of cold water to the jello (instead of the usual 1 cup).

If you really want to make sure the jello stays firm, you can skip the cold water step altogether. But I find that makes the jello really stiff and some people don’t like eating it very much.

Fill The Eggshell Molds

Eggs that have been blown out to make DIY jello egg molds
Eggs that have been blown out to make DIY jello egg molds

Now fill the egg shells with the jello mixture.

Turn the eggs over in the carton so that the hole is facing upward.

I have found that plastic egg cartons work better than styrofoam ones (as you can see from the picture above, I learned from experience).

If you have any jello overflow (which I always do), it seems to leak through the styrofoam.  And you end up with a sticky mess to clean up.

Use a funnel to fill the eggs with jello

Put the funnel in the hole. Then slowly pour the jello into the funnel.  Keep a close watch on how full the egg is getting since they overflow pretty easily.

Refrigerate the jello eggs for at least 4 hours.  They will keep like this for a few days, so you don’t have to take them out immediately.

How To Remove The Jello Eggshell Mold

Eggs filled with jello

When the jello is chilled, it is time to remove the shells.  The trick with this is to remove the shell and membrane without damaging the jello (just like when you’re peeling hard-boiled eggs).

Crack the shells by gently tapping the egg on a hard surface. I usually start at the bottom of the egg and work my way up.

Then run the eggshell mold under hot water for a few seconds. This will melt the jello around the edge of the egg and make it less likely to stick.

Jello Easter egg with the membrane still on

Peel the egg leaving the membrane inside the shell in tact.  This helps to keep the jello from splitting while you’re peeling.

Jello Easter egg with the membrane removed

Finally, remove the membrane from the outside of the jello.

If it doesn’t want to come off easily, run the egg under hot water again for a couple of seconds and it should peel right off.

Store (and serve) your Jello Easter Eggs on a deviled egg plate

If you have a deviled egg plate*, it makes a great place to store your jello Easter eggs while keeping their shape.

Jello Easter eggs can be covered and stored in the refrigerator for a few days, if you aren’t serving them right away.

Jello Easter Eggs on a deviled egg plate

The deviled egg plate works pretty well for serving the Jello Easter Eggs, too!

Other Easter Ideas You Might Like:

Jello Easter Eggs

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Prep Time: 1 hour
Chilling Time: 8 hours
Total Time: 9 hours
Course: Dessert
Cuisine: American
Servings: 6 eggs
These Easter eggs made from Jello are fun to make, look pretty and everyone loves to eat them, too.

Ingredients

  • 1 3-ounce (small) packages of jello in whatever colors go with your Easter decor
  • 6 eggs
  • 1 1/2 cups water (divided)

Instructions

Supplies

  • Egg carton
  • Metal skewer
  • Straw
  • Funnel
  • Mixing Bowl and spoon
  • Pot or kettle

How To Make Jello Egg Molds

  • Break a hole in the small end of the egg using the sharp end of a metal skewer. The hole needs to be big enough that a straw will fit in and have a little extra space around it.  And you will really make your life easier if the end of the funnel can fit in it, also...you'll have less mess when pouring the jello in later on.
  • Use the skewer to break the yolk inside the egg (this just makes it easier to get out).
  • Insert one end of the straw into the hole that you made.
  • Hold the egg over a bowl.
  • Blow into the free end of the straw so that the contents of the egg come out through the hole in the shell around the straw into the bowl.
  • Rinse the inside of the egg with water to remove any egg that remains inside.
  • Let the eggshell drain, hole side down, in the egg carton.
  • Repeat this process for all of the eggs.

Make The Jello

  • Mix the contents of one package of jello with 1 cup of the boiling water until the sugar has dissolved.
  • Mix in 1/2 cup of cold water

Fill The Eggs With Jello

  • Turn the eggs over in the carton so that the hole is facing upward. 
  • Put the funnel in the hole.
  • Slowly pour the jello into the funnel.  Keep a close watch on how full the egg is getting since they overflow pretty easily.
  • Put the jello eggs in the refrigerator and chill for at least 4 hours.  They will keep like this for a few days, so you don't have to take them out immediately.

Remove The Shells

  • Crack the shells by gently tapping the egg on a hard surface.  I usually start at the bottom of the egg and work my way up.
  • Run the egg under hot water for a few seconds.  This will melt the jello around the edge of the egg and make it less likely to stick.
  • Peel the egg leaving the membrane in tact.  This helps to keep the jello from splitting while you're peeling.
  • Finally, remove the membrane from the outside of the jello.  If it doesn't want to come off easily, run the egg under hot water again for a couple of seconds and it should peel right off.

Notes

  • Use the leftover eggs for your favorite recipe.  Saving them in 3 different bowls so that there are 2 eggs in each one makes it easier to use them for separate recipes.
  • If you want to make the jello easier to work with, you can eliminate the cold water step from the recipe.  This will make the jello a little stiffer, so it will hold the egg shape better, but the texture is a little stiffer than people are generally used to eating.
  • Plastic egg cartons work better than styrofoam ones   If you have any jello overflow, it often leaks through the styrofoam and you end up with a sticky mess to clean up.
Tried this recipe?Mention @EntertainingDiva or tag #entertainingdiva!

Have comments or questions on how to make Jello Easter Eggs?  Tell us in the section below.

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2 Responses

  • This is so beautiful but for an amateir lile myself I know it will not be easy…is there any easier way it can be done. .
    Mari

    • Hi Mari…Making Easter eggs this way isn’t really as hard as it looks 🙂 If you’re happy with half Easter eggs, you can find an Easter egg jello mold which would be really easy to fill. I haven’t tried any other ways of making them but if you really want whole eggs, maybe you could use the plastic easter eggs that people put stuff in for Easter egg hunts? If you drill a hole in one end, you might be able to pour the jello in, let it cool in the refrigerator for a few hours, then take the plastic easter egg apart to get the jello out. If you try it, you’ll have to let me know if it works 🙂

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